An Ancient Matrilineal Society in New Mexico



"Following a recent dig, archaeologists found that New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon was home to a matrilineal society -- one that saw power descend through maternal family lines -- between the 9th to mid-12th centuries.

Publishing their results in the journal Nature, archaeologists came to this conclusion by studying nine individuals buried in the largest house in the canyon Pueblo Bonito.

Thousands of ancient indigenous Americans worked in and lived in this 650-room building, each building of which had a different use. In this study, archaeologists assessed Room 33, a royal burial chamber." (ati)

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image via International Business Times

Wheelchair Accessible Garden Kit



The Suitecase is a group of architects and artists that created the TERRAform program for wheelchair accessible gardens.

Read the full article here

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via Universal Design Style (Photo: TERRAform)

Harper’s Playground



"Soon after her birth, Cody Goldberg’s daughter Harper was diagnosed with a condition that would require her to use a wheelchair for the rest of her life. As Harper grew, Goldberg soon realized that a lot of everyday things alienate children with disabilities, keeping them from experiencing the same things as their families and friends. But what really stood out to Goldberg — is playgrounds — he says in a talk at TEDxPortland."

Read the full article here

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Photograph by Cody Goldberg

Intelligent Wearable Strength: A Smart Suit for Senior Citizens Who Have Trouble with Mobility



"Wearable tech is often geared toward the super-fit or the able-bodied, whether it’s tracking intense activities or your basic daily step count, but one company in Silicon Valley is focusing instead on building a “smart” suit for the aging population.

Superflex, a Menlo Park, California-based startup that’s just coming out of stealth mode, says it’s working on sensor-equipped, computer-controlled clothing for senior citizens who have trouble with mobility. The suit’s sensors are supposed to be able to track the posture and movement of the body, and rapidly process data to send a motor “assist” when the wearer is leaning forward in a chair, getting ready to stand up, or even starting to raise their arms above their head."

(The Verge)

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Photograph via The Verge

Luke Calder's Borderless Globe



New Zealand designer Luke Calder imagines a globe without artificial borders and limitations, without definitions of nations and oceans. The "minimalist and poetic design" combines an aluminium structure with resin and copper foil (Ufunk).

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Photograph via designboom

Pretty Old: Weibliche Armut im Alter muss nicht sein



Vortrag und Diskussion mit Petra Leschanz
Mittwoch, 25. Jänner 2017, 16.30 Uhr, Infocafè palaver, Graz
Kostenlos, keine Anmeldung vonnöten

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Foto via Hotel Feichtinger

The Interfaith Peace Chapel: A Place Where Dialogue Can Begin



"The chapel is a place where people of all faiths, or no faith, can participate in dialogue, meditation and prayer. The environment and surroundings will inspire people to join voices, hearts and minds in order to build understanding of similarities and differences."
"The chapel is our visible proclamation to the world that we must all be committed to peace. It stands as a monument to the cause of peace for all who believe in it, seek it and work for it."
(Interfaith Peace Chapel)

"The Interfaith Peace Chapel, designed by Philip Johnson Alan Ritchie Architects in the 1990s, is today home to a largely LGBT congregation and has previously been a target for graffiti."
(Curbed)

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photograph via Dezeen

Algorithms against Stereotypes: SAP's HR Software Filters (Unconscious) Bias, Creates Fair HR Software



"SAP is betting that artificial intelligence can help eliminate bias in hiring and employee performance reviews.
The tech giant has been particularly vocal about improving gender and ethnic diversity (...)."

The new features include data crunching that flags potentially biased language in job descriptions that could unintentionally limit a pool of candidates (...). Descriptors such as "rock star" or "ninja" in a job description, for example, could have the unintended effect of discouraging female candidates, so the SuccessFactors software might "suggest" alternate nouns. The company is also working on similar alerts for its performance review module as well as systems used to help with planning executive successions.

In simple terms, these alerts are like grammar checkers you might find in a word-processing application. Only these are designed to flag terms that could hint at a pattern of unconscious bias. The idea is to bring these habits to managers’ and employees’ attention so that, over time, they occur less frequently, according to SAP."

(Fortune)

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image via SAP